Prime News

  • Laura Winstead - LLS Woman of the Year Candidate

    Come out Thursday night May 2, 2013 6PM Central and support Laura Winstead (wife of Prime associate John Winstead) who was nominated for 2013 Woman of the Year!  Go Team Laura!

     

    Click here for Directions.  Read more on Facebook and the Blog

  • Missouri Trucking Association Super Tech 2013 Competition

    Prime is proud of our associates Danny Schubert, Nathan Yeary, and Ethan Andrews who advanced to the final round of the Missouri Trucking Association Super Tech 2013 Competition here in Springfield, Missouri at the Ramada Oasis Convention Center on April 17th 2013.

    Dany Schubert won the Tire and Wheel Analysis and Nathan Yeary won the Brake Installation and Adjustment Station.

    Congratulations to Danny, Nathan and Ethan!

    Read more here http://motrucking.org/services/SuperTech-Compeition


  • Prime Bike Challenge

    What: Prime Bike Challenge

    When: May 1-31, 2013

    Where: Roads, streets and trails of America

    Eligibility:  All Prime Drivers

    Format & Rules:  Ride any bicycle for the month of May and use the smartphone app MapMyRide “www.mapmyride.com” to log your distance, speed, elevation, routes, etc. Only road miles count- no bike trainer miles or stationary bike miles.

    Awards:    Driver with the most miles logged wins. Special awards for the longest single road ride, longest single trail ride, single ride with the greatest amount of elevation, overall greatest elevation, fastest average speed for a single ride, fastest average speed for entire competition, most state parks visited, etc. Top 50% riders entered into raffle for special grand prize, to be announced midway through the competition and based on the number of contestants. Award winners must present/share their mileage logs and maps.

    Registration:  Fill out online registration form below.

    Fees: there is a $10.00 registration fee. Make check payable to Prime, Inc.  Send check and signed Release and Waiver of Liability  http://driverhealthandfitness.com/prime-bike-challenge/prime-bicycle-challenge-release-and-waiver-of-liability/ to Siphiwe Baleka, Driver Health and Fitness, 2740 N. Mayfair, Springfield, MO 65803

    Need a bike?

    Prime is selling the Montague Paratrooper Fold-Up Mountain Bike. Best bicycle for truck drivers. Fits in sleeper. $665.00 (reduced from $899!). $75 additional for bag.  Order through the Prime Inc Store.

    http://driverhealthandfitness.com/

  • Terminal Expansion - Prime Springfield East

    We're expanding! To assist our drivers better and help with the needs of our growing company, we introduce to you the Prime Springfield East location.

  • 2012 Instructor of the Year

    Prime is proud to announce John Callahan as the 2012 Instructor of the Year! Check out our album to see photos from last nights event, who our nominees were, as well as their amazing support staff here at Prime! Congratulations John!

  • Happy Throwback Thursday!

    Prime, Inc. has been providing trucking jobs for 43 years...Happy Throwback Thursday!


  • 2012 Contractors and Company Drivers of the Year

    Flatbed Divsion

    • Company Driver - Charles Plant
    • Contractor - Bill Whoberry

    Tanker Division

    • Company Driver - Doug Adams
    • Contractor - Rod Brown

    Refrigerated Division

    • Company Driver - Shane & Johnna Morgan
    • Solo Contractor - Chad Daniel
    • Team - Berinus Paul & Curtis Parks
    Facebook
  • Prime Inc. Drivers Honored by the Missouri Trucking Association

    Re-posted from Layover.com

    April 5, 2013 (Springfield, Missouri) - Three drivers from Prime Inc. were honored at the 2013 Missouri Trucking Association (MoTA) Annual Safety Conference: Ronald Hoover, Glen Horack, and Thomas Miller.

    Hoover, a refrigerated driver for more than 12 years, received two awards. He was recognized as the MoTA April 2012 Driver of the Month and he was named the 2013 MoTA Driver of the Year. Horack and Miller were also recognized as 2012 Drivers of the Month.

    According to the MoTA, winners were "judged on the basis of their excellent driving records, contributions to highway safety, courtesy and participation in community affairs."

    Hoover, who lives in Casper, WY, has received several distinctions throughout his career. He was the Prime Inc. December 2009 Refrigerated Division Driver of the Month and has been named the MoTA Driver of the Month three times: April 2009, November 2010, and March 2011. He also received 2010 and 2011 Safe Driving Club Awards from the MoTA. When he is not on the road, he raises and rides horses on his farm, where he lives with his wife Janet and their five children.

    As the 2013 MoTA Driver of the Year, Hoover received a ring and an iPad. "I was really excited and quite honored," he said. "I'm thankful that Prime nominated me and I'm thankful that the MoTA selected me for these awards."

    A former U.S. Army solider and volunteer fire fighter, Hoover started with Prime Inc. in 2001. He has been driving professionally since 1983 and has driven more than 3.6 million miles throughout his career.

    "Ron is a consummate professional. One of those guys who never has a negative word to say about anyone. He is a great trainer and role model," Steve Tassin, Prime Fleet Manager, said. "What you see is what you get with him. He is a real team player, with an upbeat, professional personality. We are proud of him and all of our other drivers for their dedication to safe, professional driving practices."

    Horack of Elkland, MO, the MoTA 2012 August Driver of the Month, has been with Prime Inc. since 1992. He is married, has two children, and served as the Chairman of the 2008 MoTA Safe Driving Club. Like Hoover, he has won the MoTA Driver of the Month award three times. He has also been named the Overdrive Magazine Driver of the Month and received the Million Mile Safety Award by Prime Inc. twice. He was designated the Prime Inc. Contractor of the Year for the Refrigerated Division in 2005 and he has been recognized in Pride and Polish competitions throughout the majority of his career.

    Miller, of IL, who is married, and has two children, started with Prime Inc. in 1999. Named the MoTA September 2012 Driver of the Month, he also serves as one of the 2013-14 America's Road Team Captains. He was named the Prime Inc. Contractor of the Month for Safety and Service in September 2002 and received the May 2011 Prime Inc. Contractor of the Month Award as well as the MoTA August 2011 Driver of the Month award. He was the chairman of the MoTA Safe Driving Club from 2009-2011 and served as the Captain of the Prime Inc. Truck Driving Championship Team.

  • Three drivers from Prime Inc. were honored at the 2013 MTA Annual Safety Conference

    Three drivers from Prime Inc. were honored at the 2013 Missouri Trucking Association (MoTA) Annual Safety Conference: Ronald Hoover, Glen Horack, and Thomas Miller.

    Hoover, a reefer driver for more than 12 years, received two awards. He was recognized as the MoTA April 2012 Driver of the Month and he was named the 2013 MoTA Driver of the Year. Horack and Miller were also recognized as 2012 Drivers of the Month.

    According to the MoTA, winners were "judged on the basis of their excellent driving records, contributions to highway safety, courtesy and participation in community affairs."

    Hoover, who lives in Casper, WY, has received several distinctions throughout his career. He was the Prime Inc. December 2009 Refrigerated Division Driver of the Month and has been named the MoTA Driver of the Month three times: April 2009, November 2010, and March 2011. He also received 2010 and 2011 Safe Driving Club Awards from the MoTA. When he is not on the road, he raises and rides horses on his farm, where he lives with his wife Janet and their five children.

    As the 2013 MoTA Driver of the Year, Hoover received a ring and an Ipad. "I was really excited and quite honored," he said. "I'm thankful that Prime nominated me and I'm thankful that the MoTA selected me for these awards."

    A former U.S. Army solider and volunteer fire fighter, Hoover started with Prime Inc. in 2001. He has been driving professionally since 1983 and has driven more than 3.6 million miles throughout his career.

    "Ron is a consummate professional. One of those guys who never has a negative word to say about anyone. He is a great trainer and role model," Steve Tassin, Prime Fleet Manager, said. "What you see is what you get with him. He is a real team player, with an upbeat, professional personality. We are proud of him and all of our other drivers for their dedication to safe, professional driving practices."

    Horack of Elkland, MO, the MoTA 2012 August Driver of the Month, has been with Prime Inc. since 1992. He is married, has two children, and served as the Chairman of the 2008 MoTA Safe Driving Club. Like Hoover, he has won the MoTA Driver of the Month award three times. He has also been named the Overdrive Magazine Driver of the Month and received the Million Mile Safety Award by Prime Inc. twice. He was designated the Prime Inc. Contractor of the Year for the Refrigerated Division in 2005 and he has been recognized in Pride and Polish competitions throughout the majority of his career.

    Miller, of IL, who is married, and has two children, started with Prime Inc. in 1999. Named the MoTA September 2012 Driver of the Month, he also serves as one of the 2013-14 America's Road Team Captains. He was named the Prime Inc. Contractor of the Month for Safety and Service in September 2002 and received the May 2011 Prime Inc. Contractor of the Month Award as well as the MoTA August 2011 Driver of the Month award. He was the chairman of the MoTA Safe Driving Club from 2009-2011 and served as the Captain of the Prime Inc. Truck Driving Championship Team.

    About Prime Inc.

    Founded in 1970 by Robert Low, Prime Inc. is North America's most successful refrigerated, flatbed, tanker and logistics trucking company. Headquartered in Springfield, Mo., Prime's personnel, equipment and technology remains on the cutting edge of the transportation industry, and the company's growth remains steady and well managed.

  • Prime Inc. Recognizes Millionaire Members

    Recent Members include:

    Jerome T. Marcotte — Gold Millionaire
    Susan A. Fitzgerald — Silver Millionaire
    Brian E. Moses, Jr. — Silver Millionaire

     

     

    Read more about the Millionaires program here.
  • HDT 2013 Truck Fleet Innovator Robert E. Low

    HDT 2013 Truck Fleet Innovator Robert E. Low
    April 12, 2013 - General


    Prime Inc. is headquartered in Springfield, Mo., the “Show-Me State,” and President Robert E. Low says showing drivers genuine appreciation is the key to the company’s relatively low turnover rate and tremendous growth over the years.


    http://www.truckinginfo.com/photogallery/detail/2013/04/hdt-2013-truck-fleet-innovator-robert-e-low.aspx

  • Local Springfield, MO News Station Highlights Prime on Safety

    After a separate trucking company's unfortunate accident that recently
    happened in Southwest Missouri, KSPR 33 asked Prime about their driver
    safety training.

    See News Story Here.

     

  • Trucking advocates say driving fatigue has to be stopped

    Reposted from KY3.com.

    SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- There is a push to make the roads safer after a deadly wreck in Republic on Wednesday.  A California man is charged with two counts of involuntary manslaughter after police say he caused a chain reaction wreck.

    That crash killed Lawrence Coan, 65, and Corey Gresham, 41, when they were rear-ended and became sandwiched between two big rigs on U.S. 60.   According to trucking advocates, it's a situation that could have been prevented.

    "It has been the number one safety problem in the trucking industry every year for the last 30 years," said lawyer and truck driver safety advocate Dan Ramsdell.

    He says driver fatgiue happens too often.

    "There are roughly 110,000 people each year that are killed or injured in crashes with big trucks."

    Ramsdell says more than a third are caused by driver fatigue.

    "You have inattentiveness, you have lane changes, you have failure to slow, you've got all kinds of little issues that each can have a fatigue base to it," Ramsdell said.

    In the case of the recent wreck in Republic, the driver, Lei Sun, had driven over the legal limit -- 70 hours in an eight-day period as regulated by the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration.  Records from the FMCSA show the company Sun worked for had marks against it. Out of the last four inspections in a 24-month period, half the drivers were deemed out of service.

    "That means that he was declared by a federal enforcement officer to be illegally behind the wheel for any one of a number of reasons, one of which is fatigue driving -- that's the most frequent one," Ramsdell said.

    Over at Prime Trucking in Springfield, safety is a serious issue.

    "We spend a lot of money to make certain we are as safe as we can possibly be," said Prime Trucking Director of Safety Don Lacy.

    One way the company curbs driver fatigue is electronic logging. They use the electronic systems instead of written logs that can be altered.

    "They were easy to cheat on. When you go to electronic logs, that takes all of that away," Lacy said.

    Even if a driver stays within the legal limits of hours, fatigue can still happen. Prime finds other ways to fight back.

    "We have a system called OnGuard.  It actually sends a warning to the driver if he was approaching particularly a stopped vehicle. Then it applies the brakes."

    Ramsdell says not every company operates like Prime, and driver fatigue continues to be a major problem on the road.

    "The whole problem is greed based," he said.

    To a point, Prime agrees.

    "It's done for money. Of course people get fatigued. They make mistakes. They have accidents," Lacy said.

    A good starting point to fixing the problem, both say, is changing the way the industry does business.

    "Electronic on-board recorders should be mandatory in this business," said Lacy.

    "The companies actually made more money by complying with the law. That's a pretty strong message," Ramsdell said.

    Ramsdell goes further.  He believes, until the companies are held legally responsible for their drivers, nothing will truly change.


  • Ron Hoover wins Driver of the Year

    Ron Hoover wins Driver of the Year

    Ron Hoover was selected as the Driver of the Year by the Missouri Trucking Association last night at the MOTA Banquet.  Prime is proud of Ron Hoover for being chosen for this honor as well as Thomas Miller and Glen Horack who were also nominated for this award.

  • Springfield trucking company puts drivers on simulators before roads

    Reposted from KSPR.com.

    SPRINGFIELD, Mo. -- Those who drive them have called semis 80,000-pound missiles but only, they say, if the people operating them don't know what they're doing.  At Prime Incorporated, based in Springfield and one of the largest trucking companies in the country, they say it's safety-first.

    Training to drive with Prime starts in a classroom, not on the road.  It's a long road to get to the road.  Even those who have driven for other companies take computer tests and what Prime calls the most realistic test available to ensure they're road ready.

    It's like an arcade for adults.  Only the object is to get through this course without killing anybody.

    Josh Bishop sat behind the wheel of a giant simulator on Wednesday afternoon.  He has been a truck driver for six years but not for Prime, so he has to master this virtual road before the company will put him on the real road.  He already knows the real road can be hazardous.

    "A lady side-swiped me about a year ago," Bishop said.

    He didn't cause the collision but he still felt bad.

    "I was worried about her."

    Instructor Wally Anthony's job is to teach drivers how to avoid those situations whenever possible.

    "All of our drivers have to go through the simulators before they go out on a truck, and the simulators are really neat because I can sit there and watch a gentleman drive and tell he's hitting his gears, checking his mirrors, keeping it in the lanes, the correct speed, that they're looking down the road," and thinking ahead, Anthony said, because time is not on their side.

    Stopping a semi truck is no easy task.  A truck traveling 60 miles an hour will take the length of two football fields to gradually come to a complete stop.  Then once a driver does stop, he has another distance to consider.

    "Ten foot ahead, so when you're stopped at a stoplight you want at least ten feet between you and the vehicle in front of you," said Anthony.

    Anthony says not every driver demonstrates the awareness behind the wheel that Prime seeks.

    "Out of 40 students, we might send three home."

    Bishop probably isn't one of them.  He almost beat the game -- almost.

    "It would have been better if I got all 100s," he said, grinning, looking down at three categories on his results sheet.  Two are 100 percent, one is 99 percent.

    Drivers who haven't driven before have to spend at least 75 hours in the actual truck with a trainer.  Sometimes they drive for as many as 150 supervised hours, and that's after the simulator and all the classroom work.

    Veteran drivers with Prime do a review on the simulator every year.  If one gets into what Prime defines as a preventable accident on the real road, he or she meets with the company's safety board to determine if more training is needed.

  • Prime Inc. Announces Large Scale TrailerTail Deployment

    ATDynamics, a global supplier of semi-trailer rear-drag aerodynamics technology, announced at the Mid-America Trucking Show that Prime Inc.,  after extensive fuel economy and durability testing, is installing TrailerTail aerodynamic fairings on all remaining new trailers, approximately 450, purchased by Prime in 2013.

    After extensive technology evaluation, including independent SAE Type II J1321 testing and wind tunnel testing, Prime found that a combination of TrailerTails and trailer skirts provided fuel savings at highway speed of any commercially available fairing technology.

    More than 12,000 ATDynamics TrailerTails are currently deployed in the United States with more than 50,000 expected on U.S. highways by 2014.

    At ATDynamics press conference at MATS, it was stated that the company has approximately 99% of the market share and experienced a sales growth from 2011 to 2012 of around 500%.



  • HDT Fleet Innovator Robert E. Low Shows Appreciation for his Drivers

    Prime Inc. is headquartered in Springfield, Mo., the “Show-Me State,” and President Robert E. Low says showing drivers genuine appreciation is the key to the company’s relatively low turnover rate and tremendous growth over the years.

    What would become Prime Inc. got its start when Low bought a dump truck while attending college in the early ‘70s.

    He later traded the dump truck for a road truck, then dropped his pursuit of a degree for trucking.

    Low doubled the size of the fleet every year from 1972 through 1979, when, at age 29, he made a million dollars. Within two years, however, he paid the price for that rapid growth and landed in bankruptcy court.

    Not only had deregulation hit, but the company had too much debt.

    “When the prime interest rate went to 21.5%, that ate up that million dollars in profit pretty quickly,” Low says. “We spent three and a half years in Chapter 11. It was really dark times, but we developed a lot of the culture and business practices that we employ today, that have been the touchstones to Prime’s success.”

    One of those touchstones is Prime’s independent contractor business model.

    “The driver as the owner of the truck is the best way to pay drivers, and the most powerful way to motivate them to act like business-people and be rewarded for the right business practices such as fuel efficiency and productivity,” he says.

    The practice started out as a necessity. Prime couldn't get credit to buy new trucks. However, it was able to use available tax incentives to get third-party investors to buy equipment. Prime then teamed up drivers with the investors in a sort of profit-sharing program.

    “When Prime came out of Chapter 11, we

    kind of took the investors’ place and we continued to refine the program,” Low says.

    Today, although about 300 of Prime's contractors own their equipment or are financing it through other sources, most contractors lease their trucks through a Prime subsidiary called Success Leasing.

    Then they turn around and lease the truck to Prime under an operating lease. Contractors who decide the grass might be greener at another company are free to sign on elsewhere and keep up their lease payments with Success Leasing.

    After the lease is up, drivers can turn in the truck and start a new one. About 15% of the time, Low says, they go ahead and set up a loan with Success Leasing to buy out the residual value and own the truck outright.

    Building a smart owner-operator

    It's not enough, however, to team up a driver and a truck and expect to have a successful owner-operator.

    “We want our drivers to be as capable and as qualified and as knowledgeable and as smart as they can be,” Low says. “They don't have the time and resources the company has to research the most fuel-efficient equipment and driving techniques, so we have programs that help them with that.”

    Prime's Associate Career Enhancement, or ACE, program, teaches classes based on Small Business Administration guidelines on how to be in business for yourself, how to create a cash flow report, how to compute miles per gallon, etc.

    Today, Prime has more than 5,000 trucks in its fleet, and two-thirds of those are independent contractors. In addition to the individual owner-operators, Prime has a division for small fleets who form their own LLC entities, acquire their own operating authority, get their own insurance, and operate under a brokerage agreement with Prime.

    “Some of these guys started here and are up to 50 or 60 trucks,” Low says. “We love seeing that.”

    Showing the love

    There's a lot more that Prime offers its contractors, as well, which helps explain why its turnover is around 50% although Low says there is still room for improvement.

    Training: Prime uses its experienced contractors as CDL training instructors, along with some classroom training, simulators and a private training pad, to help train new drivers.

    Trainees must have 80,000 to 100,000 miles in the program as second seats before they're allowed to hit the road on their own.

    “They have a good solid foundation from a real quality trainer in a one-to-one teacher-to-student ratio,” Low says.

    The amount they're paid is a function of the longevity of the trainee, so the trainers tend to stay in touch with former trainees to help them work through some of the questions and challenges new drivers have, which also helps retention.

    Driver Amenities: “We take a lot of pride in our driver amenities,” Low says, believing that by investing in such facilities Prime is showing in a concrete way that it values its contractors.

    Its Millennium facility at its headquarters opened in 2000 and features a fitness facility including a basketball court (where Low frequently plays a game with drivers and other employees), a spa, a salon, an upscale cafeteria, a 55-seat movie theater, child care, a physician's office with a company doctor, driver lounges, laundry facilities, sleeping rooms — all the conveniences of home.

    Another facility in Scranton, Pa., has many of the same amenities.

    Driver Health: As the Truckload Carriers Association chairman this year, Low has made driver health his primary initiative, expanding on work done at Prime Inc.

    “If you really love your drivers, what are you doing about their health?” he asks, adding, “The only truly safe driver is a healthy driver.”

    Prime has a dedicated driver fitness coach, Siphiwe Baleka, a triath-lete who went through Prime's driver training and lease program.

    He runs small groups of drivers through a 13-week program, teaching them how to eat and exercise to lose weight and stay fit.

    “It's become very popular to say, ‘We love our drivers,'” Low says. “We try to do things so it's more than that. If you're not walking the talk, it rings hollow.”

  • Prime Inc. Contractors of the Month February 2013

    February 2013 Awardees include:

    Richard Daniels Jr.

    Refrigerated Division

    Anthony V. Lopez

    Flatbed Division

    John H. Quick

    Tanker Division

    Rogena Derboven

    Company Tanker Division

    Ernest L. Garneau

    Company Refrigerated

    Fidencio Aguilar

    Company Flatbed Division

    Thomas K. Bryant & Phillip Lewis

    Refrigerated Team Division

  • Prime Inc. Recognizes Millionaire Members

    Recent Members include:

    R D Smith

    Three Million Mile Millionaire

    Russell C. Reed

    Two Million Mile Millionaire

    Peter F. Del Negro

    Two Million Mile Millionaire

    Matthew J. Buchanan

    Gold Millionaire

    Robert L. Follmer

    Gold Millionaire

    Brian Kretzschmar

    Gold Millionaire

    James E. Lewallen

    Gold Millionaire

    Angela McElwrath

    Gold Millionaire

    Russell C. Reed

    Gold Millionaire

    Jeremy S. Ricker

    Gold Millionaire

    Dziedzorn Seshie

    Gold Millionaire

    Henry L. Stephens, Jr.

    Gold Millionaire

    Clayton E. Saxer, Jr.

    Silver Millionaire

  • Prime Inc. Contractors of the Month

    January 2013 Awardees include:

    Michael C. Hess

    Refrigerated Division

    James A. Brown

    Flatbed Division

    Darin J. Hagerman

    Tanker Division

    Edward J. Jordan

    Company Tanker Division

    Michael P. Perry

    Company Refrigerated

    John A. Edwards

    Company Flatbed Division

    Michael M. Sparks & Nicholas Webster

    Refrigerated Team Division

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